My Blog Has Moved!

With the latest update to my website, I can now blog from there! WordPress has been good to me, but I’m excited to blog from my own platform.

If you want to keep seeing my content you have two options.

  1. You can friend me on Facebook, where I share all my new articles.
  2. You can sign up for my newsletter

Either way, I hope you’ve enjoyed my articles and I hope I haven’t lost you as a reader!

Cheers!

P.S. I have an instagram now! Follow me @mortonfitness

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Turning Your Excuses Into Progress

Excuses aren’t helpful. Agreed? Good.

Moving on.

More important are the reasons we feel inclined to make an excuse.

An excuse is used as a justification for a mistake or imperfection. Excuses seek to lessen blame or judgement.

Considering how fucking judgy the fitness world can be, no wonder it’s riddled with excuses. We hate feeling judged!

If we think we’re going to be judged, an excuse is a rational defense mechanism. We all make excuses for our imperfections, so there will be no high horses allowed.

get-off-your-high-horse

I don’t fault people for making excuses. That said, if we own the fuck out of our imperfections, we will nurture a greater capacity for growth and behavior change.

The excuses we make to ourselves hold us back the most.

Excuses prevent us from being honest with ourselves.

Self talk matters. When we make excuses, we shirk responsibility.

The missing factor here is acceptance.

We can’t fix our mistakes if we don’t accept the fact that we made them. To move forward we need to be brutally honest.

Excuses are sustain talk– they reinforce our internal status quo.

Taking responsibility and really owning our shit is hard, but it’s challenge worth undertaking.

Reasons, on the other hand, are an analysis. Reasons seek to objectively explain a series of events.

The search for reasons implies acceptance, mindfulness, and assessment. All of which are necessary to overcome our barriers, rather than continue to bash our faces against them.

So how do we turn excuses into reasons?

Build a habit of mindfulness around excuses.

Be on the lookout for excuses. When you notice one, dive into the fear shower and seek out the reasons you made that excuse.

You’re trigger for practicing this habit is guilt. Feelings of guilt usually precede excuses.

If you notice something else that would serve as a more consistent, obvious trigger then by all means use that.

We all have different relationships with food and exercise. I don’t mean to paint this issue as being black and white. My aim is simply to provide a starting point for exploring this relationship.

When you’re trigger happens, tell yourself out loud, “It’s OK”, ideally in the mirror. Next, try to objectively tease out the reasons for the decision in question. A journal where you reflect on your fitness journey can work wonders here.

Note that feelings (guilt, sadness, stress etc) can be objective reasons.

Objective simply means honest. Objective doesn’t mean denying your feelings. It’s actually the opposite. Objectivity means fully embracing and accepting that, “This is how I feel”.

torn

Be brutally honest. It doesn’t matter what the reason is, as long as it’s honest.

“I was tired and didn’t feel like it” is honest. “It’s OK because I went for a run today” isn’t.

If we can remove moral attachment to foods we can lessen food guilt and the ensuing excuses that stand in the way of our fat loss goals.

Another way to combat food guilt and excuses is to join a crew of people you know won’t judge you because they are experiencing the same struggles.

A culture built around growth and acceptance might be the best way conquer this. And I’m not just saying that because I want you to join the Tribe of Badassery Coaching Group. I promise 🙂

 

Did you like this post? Do you hate my guts and want to tell me personally? Either way, you should opt in at http://mortontrainingsystems.com/ and get my free ebook “Insanity Free Loss”

 

2 Simple Tips And 1 Less-Simple Tip To Break The Snacking Habit

Snacking is an easy way to unknowingly rack up extra calories.

You know this.

But what if having this knowledge doesn’t fix the problem? How do we effectively reduce our snacking?

Eat bigger meals

Snacking isn’t inherently at odds with fat loss.

In fact, the 3 solid meals + 1 snack a day setup seems to work really well for most people. However, compulsive snacking is where we run into some problems.

This is where the “don’t eat after 10 pm” myth stems from. The food we eat after 10 is usually compulsive. We eat out of boredom or stress, not because we’re actually hungry.

When people stop eating after 10, they cut out a decent amount of compulsive eating. The weight loss here is correlation, not causation.

We’re not gremlins. Eating after 10pm doesn’t automatically cause weight gain.

Caloric balance still matters–meal timing doesn’t change that. It’s just that we often eat calories we don’t need after 10.

Sorry. I got sidetracked. Back to eating bigger meals.

We should feel satisfied after meals.

Fullness doesn’t necessarily mean we’ve overeaten. For example, feeling stuffed from grilled chicken vs. pizza will yield two drastically different caloric scenarios.

Feeling satisfied after meals will help limit the impulse to snack.

Less cravings= less need for willpower=less feelings of deprivation=less snacking.

Don’t keep unhealthy snacks around the house

Our environment greatly influences our behavior in ways we may not realize.

whats water

If snacks aren’t in the house, our cravings won’t be triggered. And if we want ice cream we have to change out of our lazy pants and walk all the way to the store. Ain’t nobody got time for that!

We’re using the same logic here as in last section. The goal isn’t to get good at white knuckling through cravings, but to engineer infrastructure to avoid the cravings altogether.

We want to make healthy behaviors more convenient and unhealthy behaviors inconvenient. This drastically increases our chances of successfully changing our snacking habits.

But what about if I have zero control of my environment? What about the candy bowl at work?

This situation is SUPER tricky to deal with. That candy bowl is always freaking there and you always have to walk by it!

However, there are some strategies we can use to make this situation easier:

-Walk around the snack bowl when possible. Figure out what triggers your snacking here, and do your best to avoid said trigger.

-If you have a snack craving, let the craving sit for 30 minutes. If you still want that fun size Snickers (Twix is clearly the superior option, but I won’t hold it against you) after that half hour, commit to having half a serving. If you want the rest after another half hour, go for it. With practice, this will get easier.

-If you have a craving, go for a walk or watch a youtube video or something. “Change the subject” in some way.

-Joining a group of supportive, welcoming individuals who are working on this same snacking habit is the most surefire way to deal with this situation. Having that support, camaraderie, and accountability makes dietary struggles less daunting.

By joining my online Tribe of Badassery Coaching Group you will become part of an awesome crew of like minded individuals that motivate each other to conquer their fat loss struggles. We struggle together, and we change together.

Want to be part of a community, but don’t feel like paying for coaching? You’re in luck! Join the party that is my free Facebook group Sustainable Strength

 

Did you like this post? Do you hate my guts and want to tell me personally? Either way, you should opt in at http://mortontrainingsystems.com/ and get my free ebook “Insanity Free Loss” 🙂

 

Weekly Fitness Reads: 5/9/16

http://amydix.com/cheat-days-sucky-diets-and-how-to-end-the-struggle-between-fun-and-fat-loss/

Diets objectively suck, but fat loss doesn’t have to. Amy Dix does a fantastic job of providing practical solutions and perspective to struggles every dieter has faced.

http://www.leighpeele.com/a-response-to-the-ny-times-biggest-loser-study

It’s a shame when respected sources crank out nonsense. The damage is far more expansive when a news entity has a good reputation. Here’s what you need to know about the NY times biggest loser study.

http://www.askingforwhatyouwant.com/2016/04/29/take-a-fear-shower/

Fear holds us back in one way or another. The author helps us pinpoint the origin of our fears in order to accept them. I’m choosing to interpret this as a recommendation to go stand in a cave full of bats and become the hero that Gotham deserves.

 

Did you like this post? Do you hate my guts and want to tell me personally? Either way, you should opt in at http://mortontrainingsystems.com/ and get my free ebook “Insanity Free Loss” 🙂

P.S. If you want to become part of a tribe of awesome people like you who dominate their fat loss without dieting, make sure to apply to join Tribe of Badassery Coaching Group.

Why The Notorious Plateau Is A Good Thing And How To Move Past It

The plateau isn’t just a river in Egypt.

That’s how that phrase goes right?

The plateau might be the most well known geological metaphor in fitness.

And we hate that metaphor.

We hate that things were going so smooth, we were losing weight, we were getting stronger, our clothes were fitting better, we were feeling super awesome and confident, we were feeling steadfast and determined.

Then everything came to a screeching halt.

It sucks. Everything was going so well.

Now we begin to question our methods. Because we are inquisitive and adventurous, we start exploring different fitness strategies. This can be a great thing. However, the plateau makes us impatient. This means we bounce around from method to method too quickly. We don’t give each one an honest try.

It’s frustrating, especially when we compare this plateau period to how quickly progress was happening before.

The plateau is actually a good thing.

Maybe even a great thing. In fact, the end goal is to plateau.

The enemy of all dieters is the yoyo and the instability that brings. The plateau is the opposite of this.

yoyo

It might feel like stagnation. And there’s no denying the frustration.

That shit is valid.

That said, the plateau can be necessary.

People plateau for different reasons. Sometimes it’s because they hit that “10 lbs to go!” mark where the game gets a little trickier. Sometimes it’s because work got insane so they don’t have as much time or energy to devote to fat loss. These are the most common reasons I encounter in my Online Coaching Groups. However, I’m sure there are many more.

Either way the plateau IS progress.

Weight loss isn’t actually the problem. We are actually really fucking good at weight loss. We just aren’t good at weight maintenance.

So if we can hold our position without yoyoing, that’s YUGE.

When we plateau, we’re solidifying our new, healthy habits rather than reverting to old ones. Each day we continue to fortify a foundation that will make it easier to build habits that will help us move past this plateau.

Progress doesn’t always look like forward movement. When we drive somewhere, rarely can we drive along the hypotenuse to get there. Pythagoras Motherfucker! Told you that shit would be useful one day!

pythagoras-theorem

I know it’s frustrating. Immensely so.

And saying just to be patient is pretty nebulous advice. So I’ll give some actionable advice you can implement today.

Either way, remember to have the courage to be patient. This isn’t a “quick fix” or a replacement for patience. It’s a recommendation in concordance with patience.

Change your focus. Work towards different goals for a time.

If you’ve been focusing on weight loss, focus on strength, or learning a skill or a sport etc. Rather than doing the different things with the same focus and same mentality, try focusing on something different that has overlap with your original goal.

An example of this is the goal of learning a chin-up. While not explicitly dependent on weight loss, losing weight will certainly make getting that first chin-up easier.

The point is, shake things up a bit.

REALLY focus on something different for a while. Often times the “fix” for the plateau happens without us even realizing it.

Life’s funny that way.

 

Did you like this post? Do you hate my guts and want to tell me personally? Either way, you should opt in at http://mortontrainingsystems.com/ and get my free ebook “Insanity Free Loss” 🙂

 

Finding Your Knight In Shining Lululemon: 3 Traits To Look For In A Workout Partner

Everything is better with a buddy– going out to eat, hiking, orgasms. You name it. Pretty much everything is better when you have somebody to do it with.

This is ESPECIALLY true with fitness goals.

Enter the accountabili-buddy. This person is someone who helps keep you accountable. You do the same for them because you’re a good person.

We grow and change our behaviors most effectively in groups. Just look at how well Crossfit(ers) is/are doing.

That said, not just any group will do. Finding the right person(s) to join forces with can be a silver bullet for sustainable fat loss.

silver bullet bill

For that wonderful life-changing growth to happen, your buddy needs to needs to meet some criteria.

1. We ought to have similar goals

Losing 20 lbs of fat and gaining 20 lbs of muscle are two completely different pursuits.

While the workouts for each goal have some overlap, the nutritional part i.e.the HARD part, is vastly different. That’s not to say a buddy with different goals won’t ever be helpful. However, it’s better when your buddy shares the exact same arduous adventure with you–minutia and all.

2. We ought to be at a similar point in the journey

Maybe they’re a little better at some things. Maybe you’re a little better at other things.

This is ideal.

We don’t want someone who is so advanced we feel intimidated or awkward. We don’t want to feel like we can’t keep up.

We don’t want to be on the other end of that dynamic either. We don’t want to wait for someone to catch up before we can move forward as a team.

It works better when both of us are at the same point in our journey. That way, we can work through the same struggles feeling like equals. We feel safe enough to have some friendly competition.

3. We ought to have something else in common besides fitness goals

Awkward silences aren’t great for building accountability.

We should have something to talk about besides fitness. The stronger the human connection, the more successful we will be.

An important side effect of a good accountabili-buddy is that you start looking forward to going to the gym, hanging with your buddy, and lifting some stuff.

Boring and uncomfortable social situations aren’t exactly conducive to enthusiasm.

 

Did you like this post? Do you hate my guts and want to tell me personally? Either way, you should opt in at http://mortontrainingsystems.com/ and get my free ebook 🙂
P.S. if you want to join an army of accountabili-buddies for maximum results, I have 5 slots open in my Online Fat Loss Coaching Group for those looking to lose between 10-20 lbs.

Weekly Fitness Reads: 4/25/16

Five myths about our habits

This one nails it. Our problems often aren’t what we think they are.

A Stanford professor says eliminating 2 phrases from your vocabulary can make you more successful

These things can be a bit corny, but what we say to ourselves does, in fact, matter. Like, a lot. Granted, a difference in self talk won’t necessarily change everything, but every piece of the puzzle is important.

Is it better to eat 5-6 small meals or a few big meals if I want to burn fat?

There are many great questions every human must face at some point in their lives: Why are we here? Why are people such raging dick-wads to each other? Team Edward or Team Jacob?

This post doesn’t deal with any of those. However, it does deal with a different important question: How many meals a day should we eat? The answer might surprise you. Oh god, did I just turn into an Upworthy article? WHAT HAVE I BECOME!?!?

 

Did you like this post? Do you hate my guts and want to tell me personally? Either way, you should opt in at http://mortontrainingsystems.com/ and get my free ebook 🙂